Amy Miller - Silvercreek Realty Group | Meridian Real Estate


Whether you’re an empty nester, or just feel that you have too much “stuff” in your house, many people can stand to downsize. If you are planning on moving to a smaller home or if you want to get your family’s amount of “treasures” reduced, it’s not an easy task. We can promise that it will be a worthwhile one! 


Just how can you downsize when you have a houseful of stuff? There’s a few rules of thumb that you should follow in order to keep your downsizing process streamlined and stress-free.


Don’t Try To Do Everything At Once


The more stuff that you have, the more overwhelming your project will be. You may want to be very efficient and try to get everything cleaned out as soon as possible. It’s probably not feasible to get it all done at once. You’ll stress yourself out both physically and emotionally. Think of a realistic time table for you based on how much time you hope to clean over a certain period and how much stuff you actually have. It’s best if you plan to tackle one room and one area at a time.   


If You’re Helping Someone Else, Ask Yes Or No Questions


When you’re in the process of moving or even just getting rid of stuff, the people you’re helping will thank you if you’re direct. Ask yes or no questions about things as the whether it’s being donated, tossed, or saved. This will be especially helpful when working with children and older people.  



Presort Items


You can also expedite the process of cleaning things just by sorting them out. Keep piles of clothing, kitchen items, tools and toys separate. This process works best with items that are numerous like clothing. Once the items are separated, they may be much easier to tackle.               


Know How Much Space You Have


If your goal is to empty out one closet in your home, then you know that space will be unavailable for storage. If you’re moving from an 8 room house to 5 room condo, you may have a bit more purging to do! Just remember that there’s no point in hanging onto things that won’t be used or that have no place to be stored.


Don’t Have An Undecided Pile


Don’t start an undecided pile of stuff. It will just end up back in your pool of things that will need to be cleaned out at a later time. Make sure that you make a clear decision on what you’re doing with each item in the process of sorting. One exception to this rule is paperwork. If you need to sort through a lot of it, place it in a box to go through at another time, preferably once the rest of the house is settled. 


If you focus on sorting and seeing what your most used items are, downsizing should be a less overwhelming task. Once you clean, you can focus on more important things like moving!


If you’ve recently purchased a new home, congratulations! The hardest part and most stressful part of the process is behind you. But moving day can still be difficult, especially if you’re moving with kids, pets, or over a long distance.

Today, we’re going to provide you with a moving day checklist in hope that you’ll personalize it to your own needs, making your moving day as smooth a process as possible.

Not all of the items on the list will apply to everyone, but we can guarantee that if you follow most of our guidelines you’ll be able to sleep more soundly the night before your move and rest assured once you’re in your new home that everything has been taken care of.

Before the big day

The weeks leading up to moving day are an important time to iron out all of the details of your move. It includes making arrangements for pets, setting and confirming appointments with movers, and making sure your all of your belongings are accounted for. Consider this your pre-moving day checklist:

  1. Meet with your family and make your master schedule and to-do list. This could include things like sending change-of-address forms, calling your doctors to update your address, setting up an appointment with cable and internet companies, and so on. Doing all of these things before the move will make moving day much simpler.

  2. Hire your movers early. Don’t wait until a week before the move as some may already be booked for the day. A day or two before the move, call to confirm your appointment and double check to see if the movers require anything else from you before the move. Confirm your current and future addresses with them, as well as routes if it’s a long distance move.

  3. Also for long distance moves, plan an itinerary for things like driving and fuel breaks, hotels, food, etc.

  4. Clean house. Have a yard sale, donate used items to charity, and put unwanted items in your front yard for free. You don’t want to move more than you need and leaving junk at your old home isn’t polite and might be a violation of your contract.

  5. In the weeks leading up to your move, use or discard old pantry items or frozen food. You don’t want to be moving a lot of groceries to the new house, especially perishables.

  6. If you have pets who aren’t used to leaving home, get them used to the new house if possible and have them stay with a friend or pet care facility on moving day to avoid them getting lost or in trouble.

On moving day

Once moving day is here, if you’ve followed the items above, everything should run somewhat smoothly. Here are some checklist items for moving day.

  1. Pack a bag with items you’ll need the first day of your move that can be easily accessible. This includes toothbrushes, deodorant, soap, toilet paper, etc.

  2. Do inventory for your boxes. Odds are you won’t forget any, but having a correct count at your new home will set your mind at ease.

  3. Bring nutritious snacks like granola bars (moving is hard work).

  4. Don’t lift heavy items alone.

  5. Use sliders to move big items to avoid scratching your floors.

  6. Show your helpers they’re appreciated (pizza is always a good “thank you”).


Moving is tough for many reasons, from bidding on a house to packing up all your possessions stress is bound to happen. However, for children, it can be more stressful. Change can be harder for them to deal with and they can feel lost in the bustle of the move. There are a few things you can do for your child to ensure that the moving process goes smoothly for both them and you: Model behavior - Project a positive attitude about moving will demonstrate to your child that this is a positive event for them to look forward to, children pick up on the behavior of the adults in their lives and signaling to them that is a time they can anticipate with excitement with your behavior about moving can go a long way. Have conversations - Take the time to talk with your child about moving and what they can expect about a month before the move date. Be open to their thoughts and feelings and give them some space to feel upset. Explain the moving process to them in a simple way that they can understand, perhaps with a story played out with their toys. Ensure to not only tell them what will change but also what will stay the same. The more they know what to expect of the days leading up to and after the move the more comfortable they will feel with the process. Get them involved - If possible include them in the house hunting process by showing them pictures of the new house. If you are moving to a new town or state show them pictures of the school they will attend and the nearby parks. If it is nearby, explore the new neighborhood together and make visits to the new house a few times before moving day. Keep things similar - If your child doesn't deal well with change try to keep the same furniture and arrange in a similar layout as their old room. Prioritize having your child's room in order before the rest of the house so that they have their own space to feel comfortable in the new house right away. Unpacking their favorite toys or blankets first can help them feel more at home. Sticking to the same routines where possible is also ideal. On the other hand - Allowing your child to pick out new furniture and paint colors for their new room can help them get excited about the new move and give them some control amidst so many changes. Making friends - Practice with your child how to introduce themselves to other children. Get involved with the new community and allow your child to signup for any activities that interest them. Arrange times for phone calls or to write letters to friends and family from your old neighborhood so they feel in touch with those they care for. While moving can be a stressful time for the whole family, it can have a large impact on a child. Making time for conversations and including them in the process can not only help them feel more at ease with the moving process but also deepen your relationship with your child as you go through this life event together.



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